Author: tempadmin

The Community Foundation of Grant County, Indiana, Inc. celebrated its Twenty-eighth anniversary on Thursday, March 17, 2012 at the Roseburg Event Center.  More than 150 were in attendance to celebrate philanthropy throughout the Grant County community.    Currently the Foundation holds 286 different funds—21 of those funds were started in the last 12 months and all benefit worthy charities or charitable causes in Grant County.  This is an impressive number since this is more than double what it was just 10 years ago. Thanks to generous donations to one or more of the many funds held at the  Foundation, and also through our conservative investment strategies, we have reached nearly $19 Million in assets, for an exact total of $18,938,000. This large endowment that the Foundation administers impacts Grant County immensely in many ways.  Last year alone we were able to give over $1.5 Million in grants, scholarships, and non-profit program requests. Additionally, the evening allotted time to celebrate three Spirit of Philanthropy Award Recipients.   The Spirit of Philanthropy Award was created to recognize the great contributions of philanthropy and those individuals or corporations active in the philanthropic community that enrich the world in which we live.   This Grant County award...

The Community Foundation has the privilege of being a leader and a neutral convener in Grant County.  This means that we get to work with some of the coolest people around these parts.  No, seriously these people rock.  I was reminded of this at our recent Annual Meeting when Vectren Foundation President, Jeff Whiteside, told the audience, “You’ve got something special here.  I hope you know that.”  I believe he’s right. Just in the past week, I’ve had the opportunity to work with a group that has weatherized over 100 homes in 4 months and another group that is working on proactive ways to address local poverty issues.  I got to sit in on a strategic planning session for the YMCA, one of the largest non-profits in Grant County that’s thinking toward the future.  Plus, I got to help with this amazing Summer Passport project for Pre-K through 6th grade students which is chock full of fun activities—all based on the 40 Developmental Assets.  It’s truly incredible to know that so many positive things are happening in my our community.  Action.  Progress.  Impact.  Project Leadership Director, Tammy Pearson, and I used to say we wanted to “be a...

I love this little flyer because I want it to be just that easy.  Wouldn’t it be great if you were walking by this sign, feeling a little disheartened, so you took “hope,” and carried it with you all day?  Or your family member was sick, so you grabbed “healing” and brought it home to them.  What if you were proactive enough to choose “understanding” after that frustrating encounter with a friend?  Or you knew you had a presentation at work and needed a little “courage” on your way.  I think we can all appreciate the sentiment here.  Who doesn’t need some “love,” “peace,” and “passion” on their journey?  I think if I had to choose, I would pick “strength” for today and maybe “hope” for tomorrow.  I want it to be just that easy.  But maybe it’s not as hard as I think. The other day, Jennifer Lane-Riefler, Executive Director of Cancer Services of Grant County, stopped by our office.  She began telling us the story of her 1000+ mile bike ride she had just finished to raise awareness for Cancer Services.  She shared with us the recent diagnosis of a very close friend, and how she...

I read this weekly eNewsletter by Jon Gordon called Positive Strategies to Fuel Your Life and Career.  Who wouldn’t want to read that, right? Well, this week, Jon asks us, “So, what does Will Smith have to do with you?” This really caught my attention because lately I can’t stop listening to the MIB3  (Men in Black 3) soundtrack Back in Time by Latin rapper Pitbull. I know, I know…I probably didn’t strike you as a Pitbull fan, did I?  I’m a bit surprised myself, but it’s a catchy tune. In his article Gordon says that Will Smith was once asked by an interviewer how to explain his success.  Smith replied, “I’m not afraid to die on a treadmill.” Ok, not your anticipated reply, but intriguing.  Smith goes on to say that people may be more talented, smarter, or better looking than him, but if you get on a treadmill together you WILL (no pun intended) get off first or he’s going to die. You see, this is what Will Smith knows for sure…he knows that he cannot be outworked.  His strong work ethic is the one constant in his life and he attributes all of his success to...

Yes, you can.  You’ve no doubt heard about Facebook and Twitter.  Have you heard of Linked-In or MySpace?  These are just a few of the many “social networking” websites available to connect with new friends, reconnect with old friends, find dates, network with business associates, and electronically “stalk” people, if you like to do that sort of thing.All of these social networking sites ask you for a lot of personal information when you set up your account.  While some of the information is necessary – your email address, for example – a lot of it is up to you about whether or not you share it.  If certain information is required, a good social networking site will let you block that information from public view.  Here’s why you should block your personal information: My uncle received a late-night phone call last month from his “grandson” claiming to need money wired to him immediately.  Thankfully, my uncle had presence of mind enough to ask enough questions to realize that the caller wasn’t anyone he should talk to.  How did the scammer know he had a grandson, and how did the scammer know what his phone number was?  My uncle uses an application...

“No one has ever become poor by giving.”  -Anne Frank As we all sat around the dining room table, minus only my oldest brother’s family, my dad informed us that he had two topics we needed to discuss.  First, this matter of Little Miss Fire Cracker, crowned every 4th of July in Gas City.  My mother declared that she’s already retired a champion, as she entered my baby brother 15 years ago and won, and entered my oldest niece six years ago and won.  (Please don’t think my family is a feature story for Toddlers and Tiaras, it’s just a local pageant that no one puts in fake teeth for, I promise.)  But along came Emerson October, with her naturally curly hair and bubbling personality.  She loves to sing and dance and most of all, be the center of attention.  Some of it comes from her parents; some of it comes from her “Joy Gene” (Williams Syndrome).  Dad thinks she’s a shoo-in to win.  This hurled us into a long, drawn-out discussion that moved rapidly from one topic to another, rarely resting long enough to draw any conclusion on any one matter, and finally ending with the whole...

My husband once said that he hoped our kids would have his IQ, but be as smart as me.  I laughed.  And for good reason.  You see, he’s super smart.  The kind of smart where you never want to be on the opposite team as him in Trivial Pursuit, ever.  Put him on the same team as my brother-in-law Mike and you might as well just hang it up, because you will never win. But, why did he say he wished the kids were as smart as me?  Well, you see, common sense is my super power.  I may not always, or ever, win at Trivial Pursuit, but if you want to get something done, I’m your (wo) man!  All of this talk, combined with the frenzy of our Annual Meeting being held this week, got me thinking.  We’ve been working on this Annual Meeting theme, Many Words of Thanks, to be able to show our donors just how much gratitude we have for each of them.  Really, their generosity is what allows the Foundation to provide scholarships to hundreds and hundreds of students each and every year.  Their generosity is what allows the Foundation to give grants out...

If you’ve been reading our newsletter for more than a year, you might remember that I used to write a column on personal finance.  Being the Dave Ramsey-ite that I am, I tried to apply the principles of the “Total Money Makeover” and “Financial Peace University” to my little bit of musings and insights in the Foundation eNewsletter.  And mostly, I used myself as the prime bad example.  I spoke very often on “what NOT to do” because I was keenly aware of what didn’t work.  I even wrote one article titled “Learning it the Hard Way,” about how I had to learn from my mistakes.  And today, I toyed with the idea of labeling this particular article, “Learning it the Hard Way…Again.”No, I’m not talking about finances this time.  Though I’m sure I could.  Allow me to interject an anecdote from my college days:  In my second year of college, I was a student at Ball State University.  I was studying Creative Writing (even though a professor had cautioned all of us to hastily change our majors if we ever wanted to get a job.  Ouch.), and I, thrill-seeker that I am, had put off writing an important paper...

How does a Community Foundation celebrate good times?  Well, while we're no Cool and the Gang, we get the concept of celebrating all of the good things happening in Grant County thanks to the generosity of our donors. Each year we have an Annual Meeting—this year it will be May 17th at 6:00 p.m. at Roseburg.  And, it’s now a tradition to give away $5000 to some lucky donor that can be used to start an endowment or add to their favorite endowment…IF they are present that night. We also honor three Spirit of Philanthropy Award winners for the year.  This year we’ll be celebrating Vectren Foundation for their local work with the Magnificent Se7en Project, Mike McMillen for all he’s done with the United Way, and the Boys and Girls Club for their continued work with the youth of Grant County.  This year our theme is “Words of Many Thanks”.  Why?  Because we should celebrate all of the donors that we have who make the hundreds of scholarships we give possible, not to mention the hundreds of thousands of dollars that are given toward projects and programming in the Grant County area. We celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, and holidays.  Why...