Author: tempadmin

No doubt many of you have seen The Hunger Games and have heard those famous words spoken by Katniss Everdeen, “I volunteer as tribute.”  (I saw it on opening day and thought it was great, by the way!) However, I wouldn’t recommend the playing of any real Hunger Games in Grant County, nor would I advise anyone to actually volunteer as tribute.  That kind of crazy talk can be left to the movie-makers!   But, making a tribute and volunteering as tribute are two very different things. All this to say that the Foundation Team has been working hard this past week to give our Honorary and Memorial Tributes a much-needed facelift.  After all, the concept of donors making a tribute in honor or in memory of special people in their lives has been around for quite some time.  We’ve received donations to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, honor roll, and various holidays.  Often we’ll receive donations in lieu of flowers to memorialize the loss of a loved that has passed away.  You name it; we’ve probably received a Tribute to commemorate it! But, why make a Tribute?  Well, more often than not, you just know that another gift will just be one more thing to...

On April 5, 2012, eleven of Grant County’s outstanding graduating seniors were honored with the Community Foundation’s Academic Excellence Awards.  Miranda Fuchs from Marion High School and Lanora Osborne from Mississinewa High School each received the prestigious Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship.  Now known as “Lilly Scholars”, they will receive full tuition for four years to the Indiana college of their choice, plus a $900 stipend for required books and equipment. Miranda Fuchs, daughter of Stephen Fuchs and Tamela Holt, ranks second in her class with a 4.0 gpa and plans to study visual communications at Indiana Wesleyan University.  Miranda Fuchs, Lilly Scholar 2012 Lanora Osborne, daughter of Michael and Linda Osborne ranks first in her class with a 3.90 gpa.  She plans to study pharmacy at Butler University. Lanora Osborne, Lilly Scholar 2012 Other Lilly finalists included Eastbrook’s Chris Pak, King’s Academy’s Rebekah Miner, Madison-Grant’s Lyndsay Christensen, and Oak Hill’s Kendall Drook.  Each of these students received a $1,500 scholarship from the Academic Excellence Fund held within the Foundation. Each year, Grant County accredited high schools are asked to nominate one representative for the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Award.  The representatives must be Grant County residents and have a minimum 3.5 grade point average.  Selection...

A mission is a: a specific task with which a person or a group is charged, b: a pre-established, and often self-imposed, objective or purpose. Theever-present mission statement. Every organization has one.  Maybe even every organization needs one.  But, why?  Because mission statements guide.  They inspire.  They advertise what an organization stands for.  And, they differentiate one organization from every other. Target But, most importantly, mission statements serve as a target.  Yes, a target, as in a bulls-eye. They provide a direction in which you aim for, shoot for, try to hit directly.  Targets are important.  Why?  Because without them you’ll never know if you’re making progress or how accurate the progress is that you’re making.  John Collin’s, in his book Good to Great, refers to the real target in his Hedgehog Concept. Each April the Community Foundation begins a new fiscal year.  Thus, our target for the new year is crucial.  The team here at the Community Foundation is deeply passionate about Grant County.  We believe we can be the best in the world at improving the quality of life right here where we live.  We know that the more our economic engine is primed, the more impact we...

"’Everything will be alright" is not the same as "everything will stay the same.’" –Seth Godin Isn’t it funny how we sometimes confuse those two ideas?  As a child, I can recall a handful of instances when “everything will be alright” meant that my whole world was about to change.  When my dad left his job, everything was alright.  When we moved out of our old neighborhood and left behind all of our friends, everything was alright.  When my grandmother passed away after a rather sudden illness, everything was eventually alright, but nothing was ever the same.  Even as an adult, when my precious niece was diagnosed with Williams syndrome, in a way, everything was alright, but we all knew that everything would not stay the same. But not every instance of change is a negative one.  When I decided to go to college in a different state where I knew no one- different, but awesome.  When my best friend and I decided to be roommates, our friendship changed- for the better.  When I accepted my job here at the Community Foundation, that was a major life-change for me, a wonderful life-change. And then there are changes both major and minor, that will...