Author: tempadmin

The state has announced the Torchbearers!!! Please see their release. We've inserted the Grant County Torchbearers just in case you have trouble with their link, and have provided the torch route map through Grant County. INDIANAPOLIS (June 29, 2016) – Lt. Governor Eric Holcomb, Indiana Office of Tourism Development (IOTD) Executive Director Mark Newman, Indiana Farmers Mutual Insurance President and CEO Kim Smith and Bicentennial Torch Relay State Director Noelle Szydlyk today unveiled the names of more than 2,000 Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay torchbearers, as well as the official torchbearer uniforms. The unveiling took place during a press conference at the Indiana Statehouse. “The 2,000 plus Hoosiers selected as torchbearers embody the Indiana traditions of service, civic pride, community involvement and volunteerism,” said Lt. Governor Holcomb. “As we reflect on Indiana’s first two hundred years, it is only fitting that we celebrate Hoosiers who serve as inspirations in their communities.” A statewide list of the torchbearer names and the counties they represent can be found here.  Grant County: Jess Alumbaugh Pearl Bassett Brennan Butche James Dean* David Ferguson Larry Jo Goss* Robert King H. Larry Leach Robert McNutt Chief Meshingomesia* Lila Milford Reggie Nevels Amos Randle Wayne Seybold Minerva Sickman Richard Simons* Ruthann Sumpter Jim...

Historians know the significance of the Monroe Doctrine well. Passed in 1823 by the fifth President of the United States and the doctrine’s namesake, President James Monroe, this judgment was issued at a time when most Latin American colonies had declared themselves independent. The goal of the Monroe Doctrine was to maintain that independence—to ensure the free American continents would never be subjected to colonization of the European powers again. The boldness of such a declaration at that time put the USA on the map as a definitive world superpower. While I’m no expert on politics, we certainly have spent a great deal of time this past year ‘studying’ superheroes and their superpowers. Around here superheroes are ordinary people who happen to do extraordinary things. Think Clark Kent. Think Superman. Grant County has so many leaders, donors, and volunteers who humbly fall into the superhero category—you know them, you love them, you may even be one of them! What you may not know is that Indiana community foundations have a superhero like that, too. Although you’d never find it in any history books, she’s made much ado about philanthropy with her very own Monroe Doctrine…the Helen Monroe Doctrine. Everyone in the...

Main Street – Marion, Indiana, Inc. 422 E Fourth St. Marion, IN 46952 director@mainstreetmarion.com Taylor Hawk, Executive Director 765-662-1192     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Main Street Marion Announces Courtyard Cafés Main Street Marion is excited to announce their Courtyard Cafés, part of a Summertime in the City series. Much like previous courtyard picnics, the cafés will be held in the 3rd Street Courtyard in downtown Marion. Courtyard Cafés will occur every Friday from 11:00 AM-2:00 PM, from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The events will feature a different food vendor each week accompanied by live entertainment. In partnership with the Creative Community, the Summertime in the City series will also include the Downtown Artbeat, which will feature artisan vendors around the courtyard each Friday from 11:00 AM-5:00 PM. Attendees are encouraged to either bring their lunch or purchase it from the variety of food vendors throughout the summer. The Courtyard Cafés are free to attend. If interested in vendor space, please contact Pamela Schlechty at: cc.grantcounty@gmail.com.   About Main Street Marion: Main Street Marion inspires, unifies and champions the downtown Marion experience through a four-point approach system - design, organization, economic restructuring, and promotions.  Our local Main Street office is your direct connection to the social and business hub of downtown Marion. CONTACTS: Eric Marshall, President 765-243-6495 eric@cliquecreative.com Marc Lobdell,...

Grant County gives generously; thank you.  Continue to do so; please.  We live in the 3rd most generous county in the state of Indiana.  I recall the pride I felt when this announcement was made just two short years ago.  Grant County—a county that gives abundantly, selflessly, and lovingly to help our neighbors in need.  Without a doubt, we’re still that same county today. At the Community Foundation of Grant County we witness this generosity every week.  We are blessed to be able to work daily with the most generous people and make grants to the most worthy organizations—all right here in our hometown. Without a doubt, this abundant generosity must continue. Grant County gives generously; thank you.  Continue to do so; please.  But, heed the following first. As a donor, you have rights.  It’s true.  In fact, these rights, adopted in 1993, have been written into what’s called The Donor Bill of Rights developed by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, and the Giving Institute: Leading Consultants to Non-Profits.  These Rights have been endorsed by numerous organizations, including the Community Foundation of Grant County and many other non-profits in our...

A new bike-sharing program at Taylor University is hoping to entice students to ditch the cars and instead pick up a bike for campus travel. Dubbed “Taylor Taxi,” the private Christian college’s newest program designed to promote and encourage sustainability transforms abandoned bicycles and turns them into public, free to use bicycles students can use to get around campus. Mike Guebert, professor of earth and environmental science at Taylor and the program’s director, said the bike-sharing program is part of the university’s focus on providing sustainable and healthy options for students. The program is part of the larger Up-Cycle Project that aims to make a sustainable transportation plan, with an emphasis on use of bicycles for student and faculty use, both on and off campus. Funding for the Up-Cycle Project came from grants by the Woman’s Giving Circle, the Ball Brothers Foundation and the Community Foundation of Grant County. In all totaling a little under $30,000 was raised for the program. “We want to make it more appealing to students to ride their bike instead of their car around campus,” Guebert said. The project launched with a total of 33 repurposed bicycles painted yellow and marked to let students and faculty know it’s a...

Marion, IN – Carey Services has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) – the nation’s leading organization of high-quality early childhood professionals and programming. This accreditation was earned for the Grant and Blackford classroom programming provided by Carey Services, and this adds value to the early childhood partnerships and services in those two counties. “We’re proud to have earned the mark of quality from NAEYC, and to be recognized for our commitment to this community and the children as we reach the highest professional standards for early childhood education,” said Cathy Queen, director of Early Head Start at Carey Services. “NAEYC Accreditation lets families in our community know children in our high-quality program have teachers who create engaging classrooms, enhance relationships with their parents and families, and develop rich experiences for their students to assure they are school ready for Grant and Blackford County schools,” Queen added. Carey Services serves 48 children ages 1-3 and their families in classroom settings in Grant and Blackford County, as well as 82 children ages 0-3 and families in home-based programming. Carey Services has provided the Early Head Start program since 1998 and routinely receives high marks in State...

I feel pretty confident that Hoosiers appreciate spring more than any other season…and more than any other state in the union for that matter!  We have such long, frigid winters that we long for the first signs of spring which bring about feelings of pure, unadulterated joy.  We hear birds chirping, we see trees blossoming, we notice tractors plowing the fields, and we realize that B & K is finally open for the season—Ah, yes, spring has sprung! Spring!  It’s this new life, new hope, new beginning that we experience this time each year that makes me wonder whether (pun intended) to feel sorry for weathermen or not.  I mean honestly, they are wrong A LOT…maybe more than any other career.  What if doctors got it wrong as much as weathermen?  Yikes!  But, weather is fickle.  Even the best tools and education can show you one thing and then the wind blows, literally, and it’s a whole new ball game—or a cancelled ball game if we’re being honest.  But, then I saw a weatherman on then news this week saying, ‘You’re welcome!’ in regard to this beauteous maximus weather we’ve been experiencing as of late.  And, I thought….’REALLY!?  Seriously!?’  Actually...

    If you’re never around kids you need to change that.  Kids are insightful.  Kids are truthful.  Kids are downright funny.  My son and I were having a lazy Saturday conversation with my niece, Katie, who was telling us all about how she knows algebra.  Uh, she’s 8.  We asked how she could possibly know algebra as a 3rd grader and she said, “Easy, y = 25.”  Well, there you have it folks.  All of you who may have struggled with algebra in school just needed to know the super-secret formula y=25.  Upon further questioning, to better understood the logic of the 8-year-old mind, we discovered that (1) apparently you only solve for y and nothing else and (2) y is the 25th letter of the alphabet; thus, y=25.  After the explanation, the look she gave us was clearly face language for “Duh!”.   Flash forward a few weeks and I’m helping my 10-year-old niece, Kamryn, with math homework.  She’s exasperated.  She’s brilliant and even aced the iRead test last year, but doesn’t think math is her thing.  So, there is sighing and erasing and clock-watching.  After a brief 15 minutes of changing fractions to percentages and a celebratory fist-bump, we are done. ...