Author: tempadmin

There’s nothing quite like working with Millennials that will make you feel older than discussing songs, bands, actors, or shows that they have never heard of in the entirety of their young lives. Sherri and I have taken it upon ourselves to educate our teammates on Def Leopard and their one-armed drummer, Rick Allen. Then this past weekend we got to explain that the star of a current hit movie is actually the daughter of Don Johnson…which they vaguely knew as ‘The Miami Vice Guy’. So, I knew there was no way they would know about a favorite show of mine from my childhood, Family Affair. The show featured Sissy, Buffy, Jody, and their caregiver Mr. French. Played by Sebastian Cabot, Mr. French was an English gentleman’s gentlemen to bachelor-uncle turned instant-parent, Bill Davis, in this sitcom of the ‘60s and ‘70s. Although there were many episodes of the show that I remember fondly, I loved the one where Mr. French prepared the children a meal of ‘Untidy Josephs’. After all, you can’t really be cultured if you’re eating regular ol’ Sloppy Joes now can you? I love the simplicity of this concept. The meal was basic hamburger mixed with some...

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Listed below are 24 unrestricted funds. Unrestricted funds are the funds in which our Board Members use to make discretionary grants every year. They determine what grants to make based on what the most pressing needs are in the community currently. Our recent research, done through meetings, SWOT analysis, and community surveys tells us that Grant County has opportunities to improve on the following: • Decrease Child Poverty • Recruit Jobs • Improve Leadership • Establish Overarching Vision • Improve University Involvement in the Community • Establish a Communal Identity This means that by donating to one of these funds you will allow our board to award grants towards some of the most critical charitable causes in our community. Several of these funds are named after the family or organization that established the fund. Each fund originated by donors who knew the importance of an unrestricted fund for our community.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

Once upon a time I only cheered for two football teams, the Colts and whoever was versing (as my son used to say) the Patriots. But, when Peyton Manning went to the Broncos in 2012, part of our Hoosier hearts went to Denver. A new era dawned where it was officially acceptable to begin supporting a new team. We had an Orange Crush on the Denver Broncos. It was 1998 when both my family and Manning moved to Indiana—coincidence? Peyton had signed a ginormous rookie contract with the Colts franchise; we were simply coming back home. My guess is that Manning had no idea at that time that he would think of Indiana as home one day, too. As any Hoosier knows, Manning wasn’t just another quarterback. He was different. Special. Reporters and fans alike began to see signs of just how special early on when he was asked what he was going to do with a record-breaking, rookie-making $48M salary. The 22 year-old Manning replied, “Earn it”. And that he did. He would live, eat, and breathe football. That’s what makes him a football genius. Yet some accounts depict him as completely inept as basic tasks like hooking up a DVR or...

It’s true.  Even in the middle of a bitterly cold Indiana winter where the wind chill is as negative as the nightly news, it’s all rainbows and lollipops at the Community Foundation.  We can’t help it; it’s our mission.  We connect people who care with causes that matter like it’s our job—because it is!  None of us are shy about sharing what we are blessed to do for a living.  In a nutshell, we get to help the most generous people in our community learn how to make donations to help the most worthy organizations and people in our community...

What is required of a Scholarship Reviewer? First, every reviewer must sign the Family Disclosure and Recusal Form to begin the process.  This is a simple form that asks if any of your family members are in the pool of potential scholarship nominees for a particular Community Foundation scholarship opportunity.  This form allows us to assign applicants to you for review by eliminating any conflict of interest. Second, our application process is all done online.  This is great for you because the review process is done online as well.  You can review from the comfort of your own home on a snowy day, wrapped in a nice warm blanket, wearing your house slippers, and sipping hot chocolate.  We won't judge! Also, we are using a new online software system that makes the entire scholarship process more user-friendly for everyone involved.  Yeah Technology!  But if you do run in to trouble and just can't quite get it, send us an email or give us a quick call.  We would be more than happy to help you. Finally, what does the actual review process look like after signing the recusal form? It's a simple 4-step process: Log on to the website Read the criteria for the scholarship Review the student's information Score the list of students We so appreciate...

Like many of you, I had a couple of days off over Christmas so I gave myself the gift of reading.  A friend of mine loaned me a book he enjoyed titled Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown (Sadly, no relation…because he’s a brilliant writer).  I’m so glad Keith shared this book with me because if he hadn’t, I assure you I never would have picked it from a shelf.  I’ve never been accused of being athletic, or event coordinated, so the sports genre isn’t my ‘go-to’—and this book is about the 1936 American Olympic Rowing Team.  I laughed.  I cried.  I was inspired.  I was sad when I finished it.  There is something to be said about the story of an underdog…or a team of underdogs.  Add in an Olympic berth and you can’t help but cheer on the salt-of-the-earth, work-for-all-you’ve-got, never-say-die group of nine men that brought home the gold from Germany in 1936.  Then, the author threw in a bit of romance and he had me at hello!  This book had all the ingredients of a great story…and so does Grant County. Last year brought us contradictory statistics noting our children as the first most impoverished...

It’s here! Ready or not – Happy 2016! This past week we were encouraged to look back and evaluate accomplishments, remember loved ones past, celebrate new beginnings… Some people are able to focus on only the good that has happened in the year –And good for them! We should celebrate achievements!  Make note of those accomplishments. It is interesting how a New Year will encourage us to reminisce about the past.  If regrets about yesterday’s decisions and actions help you do better today, then they have served a useful purpose. Seth Godin suggests:  “Most of the time, we use regrets to keep us from moving forward. They paralyze us in the face of possibility. We don't want to do something if it reminds us of that black hole we have in our past.  It's useful if you can forgive yourself, because the regrets you're carrying around are keeping you from holding onto the possibility that you can contribute even more tomorrow.” A few weeks ago, I attended the funeral of my dear great-aunt.  She was quite possibly the sweetest, most kind-hearted, selfless, generous woman I have ever known.  I will truly miss her. Death brings about so many emotions and questions.  I am certain my dear aunt...

Long ago in a galaxy far, far away, someone who works at the Community Foundation may or may not have been born in a car in the parking lot of a Winn-Dixie Grocery Store.  Unfortunately, her parents didn’t name her Dixie, so it could be any one of us.  We all have a story.  We’re all writing our story each day in what we do, how we help, who we love.  I write this blog just to tell you about a few of them, because they’re remarkable.  Author Donald Miller says, “A good writer can make just about anything interesting because they know everything is.”  I love that!  I believe that.  That’s exactly why our annual report this year was titled, “Not All Superheroes Wear Capes”. We’ve been having big fun at the Community Foundation toying with our theme.  We’ve been saying things like ‘truth, justice, and the American Way’, talking about the variety of superpowers at our disposal, and dropping action words like BOOM!, POW!, and yes, Sherri Rush…BIFF! like they are part of our common, everyday language.  But, the best part of it all has been concentrating on all of the humble, ordinary people in Grant County doing extraordinary...

Main Street – Marion, Indiana, Inc. 422 E Fourth St. Marion, IN 46952 Taylor Hawk, Director 765-662-1192 director@mainstreetmarion.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: GRANT COUNTY COMMUNITY LEADER RECEIVES STATE AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL VOLUNTEERISM: Dawn Brown Recognized As One of Indiana Main Street Volunteers of the Year Presented by OCRA MARION, IN (December 4, 2015): A Grant County leader and community volunteer is being recognized on a statewide level for her involvement with Main Street Marion, a non-profit in Grant County focused on downtown revitalization and economic stimulation. Main Street Marion representatives and peers rallied together to nominate Dawn Brown for Indiana Main Street’s ‘Volunteer of the Year’ Award for 2015 (through the Office of Community and Rural Affairs) after reflecting on all of the work she endured to catapult transformation into Downtown Marion.   Brown is the Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Grant County, but wears many other hats, and even carries various shovels. Early this year, she joined efforts with Main Street Marion’s Design Committee, and not only brought ideas and resources to one table, but coordinated a team of more volunteers and partners, herself included, to take the design of Downtown, Marion to the next level. She connected MSM with the local parks department and influenced...

-Sherri Rush The bad guys want us to be afraid. They want us to close up shop, hide, and stop our normal routines. But that’s not how we roll in the USA. We live in the land of the free and the home of the brave. We chug along…sometimes slow, sometimes fast. We take care of our own, and as long as we believe and live this, we will overcome. What does “taking care of our own” mean in Grant County today? We do a pretty good job of providing care and services for the disabled and otherwise handicapped, thanks to Carey Services, LifeStream Services, and other great, local organizations…trust me, I know from first-hand experience. Many low-income people receive free food and clothes from the multiple food pantries and thrift stores across the county. Some of our low-income people know about Head Start for their preschoolers. But what about the sector of our population that just doesn’t know about the services available for them to hopefully get a leg up on their situation? Do they know there are resources that can help them break the vicious cycle of poverty? This is where your bravery comes in. YOU can be a Grant County...