Author: tempadmin

Long ago in a galaxy far, far away, someone who works at the Community Foundation may or may not have been born in a car in the parking lot of a Winn-Dixie Grocery Store.  Unfortunately, her parents didn’t name her Dixie, so it could be any one of us.  We all have a story.  We’re all writing our story each day in what we do, how we help, who we love.  I write this blog just to tell you about a few of them, because they’re remarkable.  Author Donald Miller says, “A good writer can make just about anything interesting because they know everything is.”  I love that!  I believe that.  That’s exactly why our annual report this year was titled, “Not All Superheroes Wear Capes”. We’ve been having big fun at the Community Foundation toying with our theme.  We’ve been saying things like ‘truth, justice, and the American Way’, talking about the variety of superpowers at our disposal, and dropping action words like BOOM!, POW!, and yes, Sherri Rush…BIFF! like they are part of our common, everyday language.  But, the best part of it all has been concentrating on all of the humble, ordinary people in Grant County doing extraordinary...

Main Street – Marion, Indiana, Inc. 422 E Fourth St. Marion, IN 46952 Taylor Hawk, Director 765-662-1192 director@mainstreetmarion.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: GRANT COUNTY COMMUNITY LEADER RECEIVES STATE AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL VOLUNTEERISM: Dawn Brown Recognized As One of Indiana Main Street Volunteers of the Year Presented by OCRA MARION, IN (December 4, 2015): A Grant County leader and community volunteer is being recognized on a statewide level for her involvement with Main Street Marion, a non-profit in Grant County focused on downtown revitalization and economic stimulation. Main Street Marion representatives and peers rallied together to nominate Dawn Brown for Indiana Main Street’s ‘Volunteer of the Year’ Award for 2015 (through the Office of Community and Rural Affairs) after reflecting on all of the work she endured to catapult transformation into Downtown Marion.   Brown is the Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Grant County, but wears many other hats, and even carries various shovels. Early this year, she joined efforts with Main Street Marion’s Design Committee, and not only brought ideas and resources to one table, but coordinated a team of more volunteers and partners, herself included, to take the design of Downtown, Marion to the next level. She connected MSM with the local parks department and influenced...

-Sherri Rush The bad guys want us to be afraid. They want us to close up shop, hide, and stop our normal routines. But that’s not how we roll in the USA. We live in the land of the free and the home of the brave. We chug along…sometimes slow, sometimes fast. We take care of our own, and as long as we believe and live this, we will overcome. What does “taking care of our own” mean in Grant County today? We do a pretty good job of providing care and services for the disabled and otherwise handicapped, thanks to Carey Services, LifeStream Services, and other great, local organizations…trust me, I know from first-hand experience. Many low-income people receive free food and clothes from the multiple food pantries and thrift stores across the county. Some of our low-income people know about Head Start for their preschoolers. But what about the sector of our population that just doesn’t know about the services available for them to hopefully get a leg up on their situation? Do they know there are resources that can help them break the vicious cycle of poverty? This is where your bravery comes in. YOU can be a Grant County...

-by Dawn Brown Our community has failed our children. Under no circumstances will people say, We care for the next generation. That’s an untruth, the reality is Our community has been an utter disappointment. In believing that We actually succeeded Is destructive. It’s true that Looking out for #1 Is what’s best. Working together, for the greater good, with hopefulness Is a ridiculous notion. Disregarding our children Will be a difficult task, but we should do it anyway. Making Grant County a better place Isn’t something we’ll be remembered for. Abandoning hope Is how we approach adversity. All-hands-on-deck Isn’t going to happen. We all know that Most think we are destined for failure. It’s probably true, Unless we decide to flip the script. (Now read this poem from the bottom up.)              ...

- Sherri Rush, CFO Back when life was a lot different for my family, I was a Kids Hope mentor to a little girl who was living in severe poverty. I remember trying to encourage her to think bigger than her small, sad world, and I asked her if she’d thought about what she’d do after she graduated from high school. She answered, “I guess I’ll just go home.” Wow. That has always stuck with me as I’ve moved along in my career, and it has come up again as we work to tackle the child poverty rate in Grant County. Little ones living in poverty actually have lower brain development. Their brains are literally smaller than the brains of children who grow up in non-impoverished homes. Children living in poverty will hear (and subsequently learn) 30 million fewer words than children who grow up in educated, professional families. (John Peirce, Childhood Development Consultant) One in three children in Grant County lives in poverty. One in three. What do we do about this? We must begin teaching these little ones earlier than kindergarten, when the brain’s learning capacity is at its highest. There are great leaders in the community beginning this good work,...

The taller the hair, the closer to Jesus.  I’m not sure if I learned that during the Aqua Net era of the 80’s or while I lived in Texas.  But, the 80’s are long gone and everything’s still big in Texas, so that should tell us all something. It was the fall of 1990 when I met a fellow teacher, future roommate, and lifelong friend, Julie.  As a Hoosier, known as a Yankee in those parts, I was just learning the lay of the land in the Lone Star state.  I wasn’t even saying y’all, fixin’, or drinking sweet tea yet!  And I certainly wasn’t prepared for my first car ride with Julie—the one where I learned two important life lessons from the state of Texas:  (a) Nothing happens as fast as Texans drive fast and (b) Like it or not, country music is a stellar storyteller. You see, in Texas there is the fast lane and then there’s the really fast lane—that’s it.  You lead, follow, or get out of the way.  And while that may work in on Texas highways, it rarely works anywhere else—especially in communities trying to make significant change or sustainable impact.  Dr. Wright, President of IWU,...

Give Where You Live.  That's what it's all about right?  If you are a donor at the Community Foundation, you know how easy it is to give where you live.  You understand the significant impact your gift makes in Grant County when you donate to the Foundation. Here at the Foundation, we believe donating should be easy.  Our job is to connect people who care with causes that matter—and to make that connection as simple as possible. If you are not yet a Community Foundation donor you may be asking, how can I donate?  How can I give where I live?  It's super easy! Listed here are three easy ways to donate at the Community Foundation: Stop by the office with your cash or check made payable to the Community Foundation. Mail your check to the Foundation office at 505 West Third Street Marion, Indiana 46952. Donate online at GiveToGrant.org/Marketplace. And, what’s equally easy and amazing when making these cash donations is that you can dedicate your gift to anyone you know or love.  Donations can also be made in honor of or in memory of a special person.  Whether the occasion is happy or sad, making a donation in someone’s name is a nice tribute.  These donations will help to create a lasting legacy...

Someone once told me, “If Clorox Bleach, the county fair, and M&M’s could all use your mission statement, then it’s probably not tight enough.”  True enough.  That’s the beauty of the Community Foundation of Grant County.  Our target area is easily defined in our very name…Grant County.  And our mission is true to form:  Connecting people who care with causes that matter.  So, in our little section of the world it’s paramount that we do our best to help the most generous people in our community find the most worthy causes in our community.  I guess we’re like philanthropic matchmakers…not eHarmoney, but pHarmony! So, when we began noticing ‘donation dumpsters’ littering the parking lots all across our community, we thought we should check them out.  Sure, the bins seemed to provide a concrete convenience and their request to feed them with donations pulls at your emotional heartstrings…seems like a match made in heaven, right?  Wrong.  This is what common-day marketers refer to as sticky. The old Trix Cereal campaign from the 1960s (YES, that long ago!) was sticky; Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids.  The message sticks with you even after all these years.  Sticky messages are straight forward, yet tug at your...

The Grant County Community Health Profile needs assessment initiative is in full swing. MGH has partnered with Indiana Wesleyan University School of Nursing to support our data collection efforts to obtain as many surveys from the community as possible. This method will be used as a tool to understand the health and health factors affecting our area. It is imperative that we gather an accurate account of the members of the population who are 18 years of age and older and live, work, or attend school in Grant County. We are excited about this initiative and the possibilities of influencing population health efforts. This research survey is about health and health behaviors. It has been developed so you can tell us about your health and what you do that affects your health. The information you give will be used to improve health care and health education for people like yourself. The survey will take approximately 20 minutes to complete DO NOT write your name on this survey. The answers you give will be kept private. No one will know what you write. Answer the questions honestly. Completing the survey is voluntary. If you are not comfortable answering a question, please complete the response,...