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“We’ve got a good one for ya today!” bellows Steve Harvey nearly every weekday evening as we’re preparing dinner and decompressing from the day. Jerry and I always compete to try to outwit each other. He’s pretty good. We laugh at the answers—good and bad, theirs and ours. We laugh at Steve Harvey—he’s so much funnier than Richard Dawson used to be; he just kissed every female contestant, and that was just gross, even back then. And, we laugh at that fifth family member. You know the one; they never have good answers, but they cheer wildly for their family. No doubt, that’s part of the fun; it’s the recipe for game show gold. And, we always judge whether we think they picked the best two family members to play Fast Money. We wonder if they predetermine that decision or if they wait to see who plays the best? We don’t know for sure, but what we do know is that Steve always hits them on the shoulder with his cue card if they’ve nailed it—always. Just watch. He does it every single time. And there’s something about winning $20,000 in Fast Money that makes full grown adults jump up...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="center"][vc_column width="2/3" el_class="center"][vc_column_text]Serving as a board member is one of the most challenging and rewarding of volunteer assignments; especially with a community foundation—we are amazingly complex. So, our team thanks you for considering a position with one of the best non-profit organizations in all of Grant County! While appointment to a board is an honor, board members have important legal and fiduciary responsibilities. There are three things you'll need to know before you consider serving as a Board Member or Committee Member of the Community Foundation—like a TRIDENT![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="22024" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="center"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] 1. Annual Giving: Time, Talent, & Treasure [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" el_class="center"][vc_column_text] 2. Legal Responsibilities: Duty of Care, Duty of Loyalty, Duty of Obedience [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] 3. Business Model: Asset Development, Grantmaking, Community Leadership [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="center" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="center"][vc_column width="1/3"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" el_class="center"][vc_empty_space height="64px"][button size="medium" target="_self" hover_type="default" text_align="center" text="2019-20 BOARD/COMMITTEE MEMBER APPLICATION" link="https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CFBoardMemberApp"][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

One of Marion’s most prominent and least public businessmen, gave a gift in 1981 that keeps on giving. Merlin J. Loew, who owned several major parcels of property in downtown Marion and farmland east of Marion along Ind. 18, had lived in Marion since 1944, and in later years spent several months each year in Florida. When in Grant County, he lived east of Marion on Bethlehem Road. “Merlin Loew always wanted people to think he was a curmudgeon, but he was really a sweetheart,” a friend of Loew’s said at his funeral. He had the visage of an elderly character in a classic 1940 Hollywood movie. Deep lines poured from the corners of his mouth and curved around his jawline. A full sweeping white mustache draped over his lips and gave prominence to high cheekbones. Clark Gable ears were perched on the sides of his head and accentuated the thinness of his face. But he was no Hollywood actor, he was an entrepreneur, a businessman, and some financial observers said he left one of the largest estates in Grant County history. Loew came to Marion from Chicago in 1944 on a temporary assignment as an efficiency expert with the Osborn Paper Co. Since he...

The gift that Merlin J. Loew gave to Grant County is still giving, 38 years after his death, through the Merlin J. Loew Family Trust. This Trust will make final payouts totaling over $3 Million to 19 local nonprofit organizations listed as beneficiaries. On February 21, the Community Foundation of Grant County will host a celebration to commemorate Mr. Loew’s generosity and the amazing legacy he has left with the named nonprofits, their board members, and a few individuals that helped to steward the Trust over the years. President/CEO Dawn Brown stated, “Although it’s bittersweet when our donors pass away, to know we helped them leave a legacy of generosity is amazing. Mr. Loew is a prime example of the enormous impact one can have on a community when a planned gift is designated to your favorite charities through a will or estate plan.” Board of Directors Chairwoman, Georgette Miller stated, “The impact that Mr. Loew had, and will continue to have, on the Grant County community is truly a legacy. Mr. Loew was obviously a very generous man, and by setting up his trust and naming these 19 organizations, he continues to give back, even 38 years after his death. When...

The Community Foundation of Grant County has received a grant of $1Million as part of Lilly Endowment Inc.’s seventh phase of its Giving Indiana Funds for Tomorrow (GIFT) initiative.   With GIFT VII, the Endowment is making up to $125 million available to help Indiana community foundations strengthen the towns, cities and counties they serve. The Community Foundation of Grant County can use this matching fund grant to build our financial assets and support our charitable activities. With this matching grant must, $700,000 will be designated to support the growth of the Community Foundation of Grant County’s unrestricted endowments, known as our Community Impact Funds, which over time will provide flexibility to help the foundation to meet community needs through grantmaking.  The Endowment will provide $2 for every $1 contributed to the Community Foundation of Grant County’s unrestricted endowments/community impact funds during the matching period, October 1, 2018, through December 31, 2020. The Community Foundation of Grant County also chose to designate $300,000 of the matching fund grant to support a charitable project that address a systemic Grant County issue: Childhood Poverty.  The Endowment will provide 50 cents for every $1 that the Community Foundation of Grant County raises during the matching period...

158 KAY Confidence Code by Katty Kay 158 SAN Fred Factor by Mark Sanborn 158.1 CAR How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie 158.1 DUC Grit by Angela Duckworth 158.4 SAN You Don’t Need A Title to Be a Leader by Mark Sanborn 179.9 CLO Integrity by Henry Cloud 205.677 LUP Toxic Charity by Robert Lupton 302 GLA Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell 302.13HEA Made to Stick by Chip & Dan Heath 646.78 COV Seven Habits of Highly Effective People by Steven Covey 650.14 ACU Quitter by Jon Acuff 658 COL Built to Last by Jim Collins 658.18 COL Audio Disc How the Mighty Fall by John Collins 658.4 BUC First Break All the Rules by Marcus Buckingham 658.4 CAT Creativity by Ed Catmull 658.4 COY Culture Code by Daniel Coyle 658.406 KRA What the Best CEO’s Know by Jeffrey A. Krames 658.4092 HOR Trust Edge by David Horsager 658.4092 SIN Start with Why by Simon Sinek Hoopla Digital Be Our Guest by Ted Kinni Hoopla Digital E-Myth Revisited by Michael E Gerber Hoopla Digital Art of Productivity by Jim Stovall Hoopla Digital Focus by Al Reis Hoopla Digital Good to Great by Jim Collins Hoopla Digital Influencer by Kerry Patterson Hoopla Digital Leadership Challenge by James M Kouzes Hoopla Digital Principle Centered Leadership by Stephen Covey Hoopla Digital Principle of The Path by Andy Stanley Hoopla Digital Ultimate Life by Jim Stovall Daring Greatly by Brene Brown Toy Box Leadership by Ron Hunter   MARION PUBLIC LIBRARY 600 S WASHINGTON, MARION IN 46953 765-668-2900...

She was feisty. No one would argue that fact. Well, they could try, but they wouldn’t win. I think it must run in our family. The feistiness. Or maybe that’s just what feisty people say. No matter what you call it, the stories are worth remembering and, I think, repeating. Her name was Elvie. Not ElviS, as in the King of Rock and Roll. But ElviE, as in the Queen matriarch of our family. She was as beautiful as she was bold. As an adult, I totally get her—she made things happen. As one of her grandkids, I was occasionally mortified. I know my cousin Cathy remembers well, ‘that one time’ when we were nine-years-old, following our grandma to the back of Kmart. Elvie was in Indiana visiting and took us ‘into town’, as she called it. Her mission that day was a new set of pots and pans for my mom. Chances are my mom didn’t even know she needed a new set of pots and pans. But, Elvie thought she did, so it was happening. However, since grandma wasn’t from Grant County, she didn’t know the layout of the store, so she was having some difficulty locating exactly...

Twelve. A dozen.  It works well with eggs and even Tollhouse cookies.  But, when your house turns twelve, something starts happening.  It’s been a bit like dominos falling.  One-by-one, like teenage hearts, things started breaking.  First up was our washer.  I loved that washer.  It was orange.  I love orange.  And, technically it could be fixed—but the repairman said that would cost more than a brand-new machine.  Ugh.  After washing thousands of loads of laundry and probably eating an army of socks, we had to bid farewell.  So, I told my husband that I’d be shopping for a new washer and dryer after work.  Now, all the wives reading this probably know what’s coming next.  And you’d be right.  The hubs had no idea why we’d need both a washer and a dryer—after all, the dryer was working just fine.  When I informed him that an orange washer replacement wasn’t an option, he still didn’t quite get it.  That’s right, he was perfectly fine with having a white washer and an orange dryer…as long as they both worked. Any woman with Pinterest knows that’s not happening.   So, we compromised and got a new washer and dryer.  He wanted working machines...

Eight years ago, my son’s baseball team had just played their final game of the season and we were looking for a way to celebrate their hard work all summer. In my normal go-big-or-go-home fashion, I had this wild idea that we should take the whole team and their families to an Indianapolis Indian’s game. You’ve probably been to an Indian’s game before—good, old-fashioned family fun. But, I didn’t just want them to go to see a minor league game, although I knew they’d love it. My hope was that they would get to experience some things most of this team had never experienced in their short ten years on earth. We don’t think about this much, but with 1 in 3 children living in poverty in Grant County, some of the team had never been outside of our county before. Not only had they not been to a minor league game, most had never even seen the skyline of a city like Indianapolis. Not surprisingly, they hadn’t done these kinds of things because there just wasn’t money for extravagant activities like this, which would be costly for an entire family. But, they were awesome kids and I was on a...