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Independent Colleges of Indiana is pleased to introduce 31 Answers to Your Questions About College, a new web-portal where students can find relevant information about college, as well as qualify for a $5,000 college scholarship. The 31 Answers portal is aimed at helping students navigate the college preparation and selection process with a special emphasis on the affordability of private colleges in Indiana. Each weekday, from Monday, September 19, to Monday, October 31, ICI will post a frequently-asked question about college (see list attached) on the portal at www.indianacolleges31.org. Each question will be answered by representatives from ICI’s member institutions via videos created on their campus. Alongside these videos will be English and Spanish transcriptions and additional supplemental web resources. Additionally, the website and all its contents will stay up after the campaign ends for students and their families to refer to. At the end of the campaign, students who have followed along can enter into a drawing to receive one of two, $5,000-Wilhelm Construction 31 Answers Scholarships, sponsored by F.A. Wilhelm Construction Co., Inc., an ICI Corporate Partner. The scholarship contest will be open to current 8th-12th grade students. Awards can be used at any one of Indiana’s 31 private, nonprofit...

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Listed below are 24 unrestricted funds. Unrestricted funds are the funds in which our Board Members use to make discretionary grants every year. They determine what grants to make based on what the most pressing needs are in the community currently. Our recent research, done through meetings, SWOT analysis, and community surveys tells us that Grant County has opportunities to improve on the following: • Decrease Child Poverty • Recruit Jobs • Improve Leadership • Establish Overarching Vision • Improve University Involvement in the Community • Establish a Communal Identity This means that by donating to one of these funds you will allow our board to award grants towards some of the most critical charitable causes in our community. Several of these funds are named after the family or organization that established the fund. Each fund originated by donors who knew the importance of an unrestricted fund for our community.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

Give Where You Live.  That's what it's all about right?  If you are a donor at the Community Foundation, you know how easy it is to give where you live.  You understand the significant impact your gift makes in Grant County when you donate to the Foundation. Here at the Foundation, we believe donating should be easy.  Our job is to connect people who care with causes that matter—and to make that connection as simple as possible. If you are not yet a Community Foundation donor you may be asking, how can I donate?  How can I give where I live?  It's super easy! Listed here are three easy ways to donate at the Community Foundation: Stop by the office with your cash or check made payable to the Community Foundation. Mail your check to the Foundation office at 505 West Third Street Marion, Indiana 46952. Donate online at GiveToGrant.org/Marketplace. And, what’s equally easy and amazing when making these cash donations is that you can dedicate your gift to anyone you know or love.  Donations can also be made in honor of or in memory of a special person.  Whether the occasion is happy or sad, making a donation in someone’s name is a nice tribute.  These donations will help to create a lasting legacy...

Just keep swimming, just keep swimming! That’s one of my favorite movie lines by none other than Dory from Finding Nemo. No doubt, there has been more than a few times I’ve repeated that line to myself in the past 3 ½ year. It was at that time I was promoted to the position of Executive Director at the Community Foundation. It was also at the time when I learned that my current position of Development Manager wouldn’t be filled. The staff was shrinking from 5 to 4, but the workload remained the same. That’s the definition of bittersweet for sure. But, we had a job to do and with fewer people to get it all done, there was no time to waste. So, we just kept swimming. And, not just any kind of swimming. I’m talking Michael-Phelps-Gold-Medal-Winning-Olympic-Swimming. And, it worked. Over the past 3 ½ years, we’ve increased the number of donors, number of donations, and overall donation amounts significantly. Above I’ve compared 2013 results to both 2014 and 2015 to show the impressive increases. Additionally, since Lilly Endowment was so generous in 2014 with their $1,000,000 gift and matching opportunity and knowing how that type of donation can really...

In September 2014, the Community Foundation of Grant County awarded grants totaling $55,408. Cardinal Greenway, Inc.  $10,000 -  Correct a massive Deer Creek and Cardinal Greenway bank erosion problem Hands of Hope/Family Service Society, Inc. $5,800 -  To assist Grant County victims of domestic violence     Grant County Stand Down $3,500 -  Grant County Veterans Stand Down Gas City Rescue Squad $10,000 -  Replace our out-dated rescue equipment Mississinewa Valley Band  $9,608 -  Music Equipment Purchase Gilead Ministries $6,500 -  New copier  Services for the Visually and Hearing Impaired, Inc $10,000 -  Property repairs Click here to learn more about Community Foundation grant guidelines and deadlines. ...

I love that line in Jerry McGuire where Ray randomly states, “Did you know that the human head weighs 8 pounds?”  Well, I don’t know if that’s true, but I do know about 3 ½ pounds of that weight would consist of your brain.  Or so John Silva, the host of the new NatGeo show Brain Games, claims.  If you have a social life you may have missed the show.  Friday night at 9:00 isn’t the best of time slots.  But, you should try to catch it On Demand if you can.  The games and experiments featured will seriously blow your mind.  I know it sounds all brain researchy, but trust me, it’s profoundly entertaining. Speaking of brain research, I happen to love it.  Many moons ago I used to teach other teachers about brain-based learning.  It’s fascinating how the brain works.  Isn’t it intriguing that we all know there’s a thin strip of paper hanging out of the top of a Hershey Kiss yet most of us don’t know it’s called a niggly wiggly?  How is it that we’ve gone our entire lives and not asked what the name of that thing was?  It’s probably for the same reason...

Let’s just say it was over 20 years ago, at just about this time of the year, that I rented the smallest U-Haul known to man…the only one my little Ford Escort could tow…and ventured off to the unknown land of Texas.  Well, unknown to me anyway as I had no family and only knew one friend from college there.  But, hey, I wanted to pursue my dream of teaching at one of the best school districts in the United States- Plano Independent School District.  This 21 year-old traveler quickly learned a few things about Texas:  (1) You really should have a car with air conditioning, (2) you can buy anything in the shape of Texas…literally anything, and (3) nearly every radio station played country music.   The purchase of my first brand new car solved my air conditioning problem and for some reason Texas-shaped tortilla chips really did taste better; I can’t explain it.  But, as a Midwest twenty-something, growing up with classic rock-and-roll, I just could not believe there were actually entire radio stations dedicated to twangy, Wrangler-wearin’, pick-up truck havin’, cowboys.  I mean, people actually had country stations programmed into their car radios. Seriously.  That’s when this Midwestern girl...

Tradition.  Tevye taught us in the iconic musical, Fiddler of the Roof, that it’s how we keep our balance.  We do things the way we’ve always done things.  It’s the tried way, the tested way, the way that we like it.  In the movie, we see Tevye (as played by Topol) in different situations trying to discern if the traditional way is the best way, or if it’s time to find a new way.   I like the movie.  But it’s absolutely worth noting that the best rendition of Tevye ever performed was by a freshman Clayton Soultz in the Mississinewa High School 2010 production of Fiddler on the Roof.  Hands down.  But Topol makes the point well:  tradition is a valuable part of our culture. Our family has a Fourth of July tradition that we’ve kept lo these many years.  It’s not a celebration or a recipe or a game.  It’s a spot.  A spot in the Gas City Park where we’ve staked down a tarp for at least 18 years.  It’s a good view of the ground display, right next to the street, across from the girls’ softball field and adjacent to the sewage treatment plant.  Everybody knows where we...